Baltonsborough Mill Stream

Baltonsborough Mill Stream

Baltonsborough Mill Stream Map
Baltonsborough Mill Stream Map
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According to John Morland in his "The Brue at Glastonbury" the original supply for the mill stream is Southwood Brook which he argues is the true location of Dunstan's Dyke. He suggests that Southwood Brook was rerouted in a Northerly direction by St.Dunstan.

At a later date, possibly by Abbot Michael of Ambresbury, the main river was embanked and taken across the valley from Tootle Bridge to a weir called Baltonsborough Flights, so named probably from the stepping of the stonework. A road, Honey Mead Lane, accompanies the river which forms the communication between Barton and Keinton and Baltonsborough. This work has been erroneously named Dunstan's Dyke on the ordnance maps, a regrettable error which should be collected, as also that of Walyer's Bridge, in any further issue.

The reason for the formation of this embankment is evidently to prevent the too frequent flooding of the moor to the west, and also to supply a further and constant supply of water for the mill, for which the brook conveyed by the real Dunstan's Dyke has proved insufficient.

From Baltonsborough Flights, which were rebuilt in 18401, the mill stream runs for approximately 1200 metres in a northerly direction to St Dunstan's Church passing beneath four 17th/18th century masonry arch bridges. At St Dunstans Church the mill stream turns west and runs for approximately 400 metres to Baltonsborough Mill passing the site of an old tannery and cider works (now a residential housing estate) . From the mill the stream runs to Nogger Bridge where it turns north again and after approximately 900 metres rejoins the Brue.

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References: 1.British History online V9 id 117177